Diggers in Vietnam

“The Vietnam War was the longest twentieth century conflict in which Australians participated; it involved some 60,000 personnel and grew from a limited initial commitment of 30 military advisers in 1962 to include a battalion in 1965 and finally, in 1966, a task force. Each of the three services was involved, but the dominant role was played by the Army. After the cessation of combat operations in 1972, a limited number of Australian personnel remained in Vietnam, and elements of the RAAF returned in 1975, carrying out evacuations and assisting refugees almost until the moment of South Vietnam’s surrender.” From the ANZAC Portal , you can read a lot more at ANZAC Portal.

Digger is a military slang term for soldiers from Australia and New Zealand. Evidence of its use has been found in those countries as early as the 1850s, but its current usage in a military context did not become prominent until World War I, when Australian and New Zealand troops began using it on the Western Front around 1916–17. Evolving out of its usage during the war, the term has been linked to the concept of the Anzac legend, but within a wider social context, it is linked to the concept of “egalitarianmateship” You can read more here.

This is the start of a complete new army for my Vietnam War project. It will include an infantry platoon and a few armored vehicles later on. Don’t fear I will come back to some more Vietnamese and Americans later on.

This is the first digger of my Australian infantry platoon. Figures are from Empress Miniatures sculpted by Paul Hicks. Painted with GW contrast colors.

I will do an article in the future about the colors I used.

Many more to come!

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